Can development projects be Agile?

Can development projects be Agile?

Development Sector, Project DPro, Project DPro

What is the potential of Agile Project Management for the development and humanitarian sectors? This article investigates the compatibility between Project DPro and Agile PM.

The extent to which Agile PM could be useful in the humanitarian and development sectors remains largely unexplored. Originally conceived as a solution to problems presented by the traditional management of projects in software development, Agile has expanded to other sectors, and, in theory at least, can be used in any context.

Continue reading
Share this page:
Projects In Uncontrolled Environments

Projects In Uncontrolled Environments

Development Sector, Program Management, Project DPro, Project DPro

Peter Marlow, PM4NGOs Board Member, discusses at this PM Today article the unique challenges of managing projects in the humanitarian and development sectors and how a training and certification scheme called Project DPro that’s celebrating its 10th anniversary this year is making a big difference.

He explains why it’s needed, how it’s put into practice, and how you can help.

“Operations keep the lights on, strategy provides a light at the end of the tunnel, but project management is the train engine that moves the organization forward.” – Joy Gumz

Read the full article at the PM Today website.

Share this page:
Schedule and Time Management Post-Covid-19

Schedule and Time Management Post-Covid-19

COVID-19, Development Sector, Project DPro, Project DPro

This is the second in a series of articles looking at the effects of Covid-19 on project management in the development and humanitarian sectors. For the first article in the series, visit:

https://www.pmdpro.plus/a-post-covid-19-world-and-alternative-development-with-project-dpro/

How will our experience of coronavirus affect our approach to managing the time element of projects in future?

Continue reading
Share this page:
A Post-COVID-19 World and Alternative Development with Project DPro

A Post-COVID-19 World and Alternative Development with Project DPro

COVID-19, Development Sector, Project DPro, Project DPro

When we finally emerge from the current health crisis, it will be to a World indelibly marked by the events of 2020. 

The extent of human and economic loss exacted by coronavirus is not yet clear. What we do know is that life will go on and dedicated professionals will continue their work in the humanitarian sectors. But even before current events unfolded, calls for radical change were becoming ever louder as irreversible climate change becomes more imminent. 

I expect this trend to be magnified by the Covid-19 crisis. More people will consider alternatives to mainstream development that focus on culture and wellbeing rather than production based on economic growth. Concepts such as Buen Vivir, Ubuntu, and Degrowth may well become more popular.       

What does this mean for the Project DPro practitioner? Alternative development projects are people-centered and participatory, working on social and cultural issues at grassroots level. Inevitably then, for alternative development projects local knowledge and needs analysis will be more in-depth and complex.  

Continue reading
Share this page:
Conflict Avoidance and Management through effective participation

Conflict Avoidance and Management through effective participation

Development Sector, Program Management, Project Management

One of the most significant differences between PM in traditional industries and the management of projects in the development sector, is the occurrence of and potential for conflict between stakeholders and beneficiaries. Our work with national NGOs reveals a continuing need to develop strategies and processes for conflict resolution between stakeholders.

To give but one example, an NGO planning and implementing a project in an area containing several communities could be required to include numerous local grassroots organizations. Those organizations may well have different goals, interests and agendas.   

(more…)
Share this page:
Can Organisations Standardise Their Approach to Project Management and Still Remain Adaptive?

Can Organisations Standardise Their Approach to Project Management and Still Remain Adaptive?

Development Sector, Project Management

This article has been originally published at Humentum

Our sector is notably opposed to the language of standardisation. So, when preparing to speak at the Humentum conference this year on how large organisations can standardise their approaches to project management and remain adaptive, the first thing I did was try to find an alternative for that phrase.

A quick google thesaurus of ‘standardise’ throws up a long list of equally, often more, uncomplimentary terms. To institutionalise, to stereotype, to regiment or mass produce. Not things most Project Managers or organisations would want to be associated with.

Scrolling down to the list of antonyms for ‘standardise’ gave even more reason to want to avoid it. To mix up, prevent, change or differentiate. These are camps which any PM worth their stripes would much rather sit in. Our primary goal is to instigate change. To prevent bad things from happening. 

Share this page:
Five hidden skills every project manager needs

Five hidden skills every project manager needs

Development Sector, Leadership, Project Management

This article has been originally published at APM

So you’ve decided you would like to climb aboard the project management ride, and feel that your love for planning, passion for budgeting and the pleasure evoked by telling people what to do will get you climbing the career ladder. But is this enough? What about the soft skills that you need to land and sustain your dream project manager role? Being a project manager can sometimes compare to being a pawn in a difficult game of chess. You are often assigned to projects which are aimed to implement change within the business but are fraught with politics and bound in bureaucracy. In these instances the project manager is often expected to perform an act of magic to deliver a project. I’m going to give you the real deal and tell you from my hands on perspective the skills you need to succeed as an excellent project manager:  

Continue reading “Five hidden skills every project manager needs”

Share this page:
Depoimento sobre o Project DPro – Saulo Esteves

Depoimento sobre o Project DPro – Saulo Esteves

Development Sector, Humanitarian Sector, Project DPro, Project DPro Certification

Enviado pela APMG International

Nome:                  Saulo Esteves
Profissão:            Profissional de Monitoramento e Avaliação de Projetos Sociais
Organização:      ChildFund Brasil

Qual é sua opinião sobre o treinamento / exame Project DPro?

“Não tenho dúvidas de que o Project DPro é o melhor curso de gerenciamento de projetos para profissionais do terceiro setor. A grande vantagem do Project DPro é que existem excelentes ferramentas aplicáveis a todos os ciclos de vida do projeto. Além de fornecer conteúdo rico para o setor de desenvolvimento, o Project DPro permite que você seja certificado internacionalmente em gestão de projetos. Eu recentemente obtive a certificação de nível 2. ”

Continue reading
Share this page:
Project DPro Testimonial – Saulo Esteves

Project DPro Testimonial – Saulo Esteves

Development Sector, Humanitarian Sector, Project DPro, Project DPro Certification

Sent by APMG International

Name:                  Saulo Esteves
Role:                     Professional of Monitoring and Evaluation of Social Projects
Organization:      ChildFund Brasil

What are your thoughts on the training / exam?

“I have no doubt that Project DPro is the best project management course for professionals in the third sector. The great advantage of Project DPro is that there are excellent tools applicable to all project life cycles. In addition to providing rich content for the development sector, Project DPro enables you to be internationally certified in project management. I recently achieved the Level 2 certification.”

Continue reading
Share this page: