Problem Tree

Problem Tree

Diagrams, PMD Pro, Project Management, Tools

Many people in the development sector waste money, time and resources by making this mistake.

They dive into working on their projects thinking they know what exactly to do to resolve a particular community related or environmental problem.

When we are doing something meaningful, (eg. helping our community) it is very easy to get emotionally attached to what we do and how we do it. This can often lead to big disappointments.

Have you experienced this?

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Conflict Avoidance and Management through effective participation

Conflict Avoidance and Management through effective participation

Development Sector, Program Management, Project Management

One of the most significant differences between PM in traditional industries and the management of projects in the development sector, is the occurrence of and potential for conflict between stakeholders and beneficiaries. Our work with national NGOs reveals a continuing need to develop strategies and processes for conflict resolution between stakeholders.

To give but one example, an NGO planning and implementing a project in an area containing several communities could be required to include numerous local grassroots organizations. Those organizations may well have different goals, interests and agendas.   

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Can Organisations Standardise Their Approach to Project Management and Still Remain Adaptive?

Can Organisations Standardise Their Approach to Project Management and Still Remain Adaptive?

Development Sector, Project Management

This article has been originally published at Humentum

Our sector is notably opposed to the language of standardisation. So, when preparing to speak at the Humentum conference this year on how large organisations can standardise their approaches to project management and remain adaptive, the first thing I did was try to find an alternative for that phrase.

A quick google thesaurus of ‘standardise’ throws up a long list of equally, often more, uncomplimentary terms. To institutionalise, to stereotype, to regiment or mass produce. Not things most Project Managers or organisations would want to be associated with.

Scrolling down to the list of antonyms for ‘standardise’ gave even more reason to want to avoid it. To mix up, prevent, change or differentiate. These are camps which any PM worth their stripes would much rather sit in. Our primary goal is to instigate change. To prevent bad things from happening. 

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Five hidden skills every project manager needs

Five hidden skills every project manager needs

Development Sector, Leadership, Project Management

This article has been originally published at APM

So you’ve decided you would like to climb aboard the project management ride, and feel that your love for planning, passion for budgeting and the pleasure evoked by telling people what to do will get you climbing the career ladder. But is this enough? What about the soft skills that you need to land and sustain your dream project manager role? Being a project manager can sometimes compare to being a pawn in a difficult game of chess. You are often assigned to projects which are aimed to implement change within the business but are fraught with politics and bound in bureaucracy. In these instances the project manager is often expected to perform an act of magic to deliver a project. I’m going to give you the real deal and tell you from my hands on perspective the skills you need to succeed as an excellent project manager:  

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Inside four walls: 3 ways to leverage your organization’s assets, network and partnerships for impact

Inside four walls: 3 ways to leverage your organization’s assets, network and partnerships for impact

Project Management

This article has been originally published at Humentum

By Joanne Sonenshine, Founder + CEOConnective Impact

Perform an online search of “purpose at the workplace,” and you’ll find more than 21 million (MILLION!) results. Purpose, impact, social good, mission – these are all of the terms that drive today’s workforce. There’s simply no denying it.

Understanding the complexities of seeking purpose inside one’s four organizational walls is what propelled me to write my second book, Purposeful Profits: Inside Successful Businesses Making a Positive Global Impact. I wanted to better understand how purpose drives change from within. This topic is also one I shared with an audience of about twenty-five participants at last month’s Humentum conference here in DC. The theme? Growing Trust for Greater Impact. What better way is there to institute trust from within than to build on employees’ sense of purpose and mission?

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Supporting Termanin center for prostheses

Supporting Termanin center for prostheses

Case Studies, Project Management

by Mohammad Mansor Alatrash

Mohammad Mansor is one of the winners of the #StoryContest

Project Name: supporting Termanin center for prostheses at the north west of Syria to provide prostheses to 300 amputated children and women, who got injured because of the ongoing conflict in Syria. 
Duration of the project: 10 Months 
Organization: Polish medical mission (PMM)

A glance before the project fund approval:  A strong advocacy had been done since the beginning of the year 2018 to support this center, also I made many visits to capture the reality and the reliable estimations in time and costs to include them in the project design. Also, to foresee the risks that may confront us.

The project was launched officially the beginning of April/2018 , but to be honest it was through signing the contracts not with a project charter. So, I increased the communications with the staff and other stakeholders to ensure the good understanding for their roles, responsibilities and to get feedback about their concerns and fears. 

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Training professionals in project management

Training professionals in project management

Case Studies, Project Management

By Bimal Ghimire

Bimal Guimire, is one of the winners of the #StoryContest.

Hi, my name is Bimal Ghimire. I am a project manager by profession and I have been managing various development related projects/programs in Nepal over past thirteen years. I took PMD Pro certification in 2014 while I was working with World Vision International Nepal where the organization rolled out PMD Pro as a part of Project Management capacity building initiatives.

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More efficient Birth registrations and certifications process

More efficient Birth registrations and certifications process

Case Studies, Project Management

by Peter Njuguna

Peter Njuguna is the winner of the #StoryConstest. Here, enjoy the first price story.

My name is Peter Njuguna

I have implemented a project to digitize and make birth registration and certification process more efficient in terms of turnaround time and cost for citizens. The onset of this project coincided with my finishing PMD Pro course. It is implemented in coastal counties of Kenya. The project has an intensive government involvement as main duty bearer and therefore timeliness, systematic management of every stage, methodical handling of issues, risk identification, elaborate risk mitigation strategies and cost sustainability prove at scale is important. Managing such a project, whose interventions are all integrated and range from technology to non-technology and advocacy, requires elaborate project management tools to manage risk, issues, stakeholder, and budgets among others. This is exactly what PMD Pro provided me with! Elaborate, practical and robust tools.

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Can agile be scaled?

Can agile be scaled?

Development Sector, Project Management

This APM Research Fund study builds on the 2015 APM North West Volunteer study on the practical adoption of agile methodologies which provided a review of approaches at a project level, this study aims to investigate the level of practical adoption of those programme and portfolio components addressed by Scaled Agile methodologies. 

The objective of the study was to understand the extent to which scaled agile tools, techniques and roles are practically in place in corporate portfolio, programme, project and development management methodologies, to determine the level of corporate commitment to exploiting scaled agile, e.g. pilot, full use, selective based on need, as well as drivers for selection or deselection of the framework based on the overheads.

Who is the intended audience?

The proposed target audience is APM corporate members and their employees but would also be of interest to individual practitioners, training providers and those who are considering or have adopted Agile and now want to expand its use, or who have been struggling to align timeframes and products across multiple agile deliveries.

This article has been originally published at the APM Website. Click in the button below to read the full article and download the report.

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Why do we need five steps to develop a schedule?

Why do we need five steps to develop a schedule?

Program Management, Project Management

Before learning and adopting best practices for project management, developing a project schedule was a pain. I used to grab the project proposal and other available documents and then spent several hours (days) behind my computer working on the MS Project. No matter how much time I dedicated or how focused I was, the outcome was never detailed or comprehensive enough.

PMD Pro made me understand that there are many steps prior to the scheduled development, such as the Logframe review, WBS development, sequencing activities, estimating resources and duration, and establishing the critical path, to finally develop the project schedule.However, I still struggled to understand why I needed to follow all these steps, one by one, instead of simply applying their techniques at once. After all, when thinking on a task or set of activities, our mind naturally assembles all aspects at the same time: when task will start and end, the required resources, who will be responsible for it, etc.

Here are a few reasons why following these five steps is crucial to develop a more accurate and comprehensive project schedule:

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