The  Golden Thread – Project Management in Three Sectors

The Golden Thread – Project Management in Three Sectors

Partners, Project Management

This report – the third in the Golden Thread series – is published at a time where many of the certainties in place when this research was conducted no longer exist. At the time of writing, the coronavirus looks like it will have a long tail of implications.

APM’s The Golden Thread research sought to identify the size and contribution of projects and project management to the UK economy and society. Following highly positive feedback and numerous requests for further information particularly for regional and sectorial detail, APM commissioned PwC Research to undertake a second phase to build on the original study. 

Our attention turns to some of the sectors where project management skills are increasingly being utilised to run projects more effectively, efficiently and professionally.

This research focuses on three growth areas for project management, which APM believes deserve specific attention as sectors where the contribution of project management has been overlooked or lacks specific data or attention.

These sectors are healthcare and pharmaceuticals/life sciences, the charity sector, and the small and medium enterprise (SME) sector as a whole. Our research concludes that project management is offering these sectors significant benefits and opportunities, which have the potential to result in improved professionalism and better project delivery.

Read the full article and access the reports at:
https://www.apm.org.uk/goldenthread/sector/

Share this page:
“Participatory methods” during project identification

“Participatory methods” during project identification

Project DPro, Project Management

During the project identification and design may organisations fall in the trap of the conventional research as it is thought that the researcher is the expert and knows more through the extensive experience that he/she has. Mostly, this method of research will result to the failure of the project to achieve its purpose and Goal as the thoughts of the users, beneficiaries and targeted communities were eliminated from the beginning to know their needs and how to respond to. The participatory learning action-PLA research method is a set of actions that are done at the beginning of the project to investigate more about the core problem, assess the current situation and define the possible solutions and interventions that could help the targeted communities. All of those actions should be done jointly with the community members and other stakeholders. Thus, the first step for this process is to identify the stakeholders so that we can ensure close communication and coordination with them. The first tool that might be useful to identify the stakeholders is the Venn diagram. The Venn diagram is a visual tool that shows the most relevant stakeholder, their level of influence and power, and the connections between each stakeholder and the other. The Venn diagram does not give us detailed information about each stakeholder thus, another tool is needed. This tool is called the stakeholder analysis matrix. The matrix helps with elaborating more about each stakeholder by giving more details about each one of them, classify them into categories to communicate later on easily, gives more details about their interest with the capacities that they have and how we can keep them interacted.

Continue reading
Share this page:
Four traps that can lead to project failure

Four traps that can lead to project failure

Project DPro, Project Management

Accountability for results trap

Lack of management capacity trap

Cultural trap

One-size-fits-all trap

According to statistics from several sources, there are between 39 to 64% of projects that result in failure and projects’ stakeholders are more dissatisfied than those that are satisfied (Ilk, 2012). This failure might either be with operational implementation as not meeting one of the three project constraints, i.e. project scope/quality, time frame or allocated budget; or by non-reaching the project impact, purposes and Goal. The project failure can be a result of several reasons, e.g. a wrong or impractical design, unclear project scope, lack of communications, overloaded project team, lack of stakeholder engagement, unrealistic appraisals, unrecognised potential risks, poor planning, absence of monitoring and controlling, and weak institutional capacity. Those reasons can be classified into three categories: context related problems, management capacity problems, and sustainability problem (Ilk, 2012). It is believed that those reasons for project failures are the results for failing into one of the following four traps that project managers might sink into: “the one-size-fits-all trap”, “the accountability for results trap”, “the lack of project management capacity trap”, and “the cultural trap” (Ilk, 2012). So, let us analysis more every one of those traps and try to suggest solutions that can mitigate the risk of failing in each one of them so that we can increase the likelihood for the project success.

Continue reading
Share this page:
How to create and manage an Issue Log

How to create and manage an Issue Log

Project DPro, Project Management, Tools

Creating an Issue Log is an activity performed during project Implementation. The PMD Pro Guide defines an issue as:

An issue is an unresolved decision, situation or problem that will significantly impact the project and that the project team cannot immediately resolve.

The Issue Log is a tool for reporting and communicating designed to facilitate the timely resolution of issues. Without an issue log, it is possible to either ignore or forget about issues arising, only for those issues to have more serious consequences later on.

Please note that this is a resource available at the DPro+ platform. In order to access the DPro+ you must be Project DPro or Program DPro certified.

Click here to read this full guidance and access the series of “How to” guides available at the DPro+ platform.


The “How to” guides are booklets that present guidance and tips to develop some of the Project DPro and Program DPro tools. Some of the activities related to the project/program management routine are also included in the “How To” collection.

If you have an idea for a “How to” guide or you would like to write one, please contact our team and share your experience.

Share this page:
How to create a Work Breakdown Structure

How to create a Work Breakdown Structure

Project DPro, Project Management, Tools

The Work Breakdown Structure maps out the scope of the project, the work required to complete the project’s deliverables and the project management work required. It is a hierarchical decomposition of the project’s work. The WBS helps you to divide project work into smaller pieces.

Please note that this is a resource available at the DPro+ platform. In order to access the DPro+ you must be Project DPro or Program DPro certified.

Click here to read this full guidance and access the series of “How to” guides available at the DPro+ platform.


The “How to” guides are booklets that present guidance and tips to develop some of the Project DPro and Program DPro tools. Some of the activities related to the project/program management routine are also included in the “How To” collection.

If you have an idea for a “How to” guide or you would like to write one, please contact our team and share your experience.

Share this page:
How to create a Risk Register

How to create a Risk Register

Project DPro, Project Management, Tools

Creating a Risk Register is a key activity during project Set Up. During the Identification and Definition phase high-level risk analysis is performed, and during project set-up risks are analyzed and risk responses are put in place.

Please note that this is a resource available at the DPro+ platform. In order to access the DPro+ you must be Project DPro or Program DPro certified.

Click here to read this full guidance and access the series of “How to” guides available at the DPro+ platform.


The “How to” guides are booklets that present guidance and tips to develop some of the Project DPro and Program DPro tools. Some of the activities related to the project/program management routine are also included in the “How To” collection.

If you have an idea for a “How to” guide or you would like to write one, please contact our team and share your experience.

Share this page:
How to create a RACI Diagram

How to create a RACI Diagram

Project DPro, Project Management, Tools

Creating a RACI Diagram is a key activity during project Planning and is a key output of this phase.

As the complexity of projects increases, the web of relationships expands until it could potentially include community groups, government ministries, suppliers, local non-governmental organizations, universities, faith-based organizations and others.

Due to this complexity it’s sometimes difficult to know who is in charge of performing different activities within the project, and who needs to be informed about the progress of those activities.

Please note that this is a resource available at the DPro+ platform. In order to access the DPro+ you must be Project DPro or Program DPro certified.

Click here to read this full guidance and access the series of “How to” guides available at the DPro+ platform.


The “How to” guides are booklets that present guidance and tips to develop some of the Project DPro and Program DPro tools. Some of the activities related to the project/program management routine are also included in the “How To” collection.

If you have an idea for a “How to” guide or you would like to write one, please contact our team and share your experience.

Share this page:
How to create an Objectives Tree

How to create an Objectives Tree

Project DPro, Project Management, Tools

Creating an Objectives Tree is an activity performed during project Identification and Definition. It is the second step towards creating a logical framework for the project and enables you to consider a positive future state in the target community when your project has had beneficial results.

Please note that this is a resource available at the DPro+ platform. In order to access the DPro+ you must be Project DPro or Program DPro certified.

Click here to read this full guidance and access the series of “How to” guides available at the DPro+ platform.


The “How to” guides are booklets that present guidance and tips to develop some of the Project DPro and Program DPro tools. Some of the activities related to the project/program management routine are also included in the “How To” collection.

If you have an idea for a “How to” guide or you would like to write one, please contact our team and share your experience.

Share this page:
How to create a Problem Tree

How to create a Problem Tree

Project DPro, Project Management, Tools

Creating a Problem Tree is an activity performed during project Identification and Definition. It is the first step towards creating a logical framework for the project, to be followed by the creation of an Objectives Tree.

Please note that this is a resource available at the DPro+ platform. In order to access the DPro+ you must be Project DPro or Program DPro certified.

Click here to read this full guidance and access the series of “How to” guides available at the DPro+ platform.


The “How to” guides are booklets that present guidance and tips to develop some of the Project DPro and Program DPro tools. Some of the activities related to the project/program management routine are also included in the “How To” collection.

If you have an idea for a “How to” guide or you would like to write one, please contact our team and share your experience.

Share this page:
How to perform a Change Control Process

How to perform a Change Control Process

Project DPro, Project Management, Tools

The Change Control Process is a process map that helps Project Managers make changes to the project plan. It is used in the Implementation phase of the project.

Please note that this is a resource available at the DPro+ platform. In order to access the DPro+ you must be Project DPro or Program DPro certified.

Click here to read this full guidance and access the series of “How to” guides available at the DPro+ platform.


The “How to” guides are booklets that present guidance and tips to develop some of the Project DPro and Program DPro tools. Some of the activities related to the project/program management routine are also included in the “How To” collection.

If you have an idea for a “How to” guide or you would like to write one, please contact our team and share your experience.

Share this page: