The fastest learner wins. Every day.

The fastest learner wins. Every day.

Leadership, PM4NGOs
This article has been originally published at APMG Technology is moving rapidly – so how do we keep up? CEOs complain about the lack of employee’s essential skills According to PwC’s 22nd Annual Global CEO Survey, four out of five CEOs complain about their employees lack of essential skills and identified this factor as a threat to growth. The problem has escalated over the past five years and is raised consistently across all regions: CEOs in Japan and Central/Eastern Europe are most worried (95% and 89%, respectively), whereas those in Italy (55%) and Turkey (45%) are the least anxious about it. The skills shortage can restrict growth chiefly because it stifles innovation and raises workforce costs. It’s understandable that organizations are concentrating on reskilling. Given the right context, people can be highly adaptable,…
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The Importance of Learning Retention Programs

The Importance of Learning Retention Programs

Training
This article was originally published on Humentum by Education Technology Insights. According to the 2017 State of the Industry report from the Association for Talent Development, in 2016 the average employer spent $1273 per person per year on professional development, representing more than 100 billion dollars. A 2010 McKinsey study estimated that only 25 percent of spending on training led to measured results.  This means roughly the GDP of Delaware worth of training each year leads to no measurable results. This is simply not acceptable. As learning and development professionals, we have a responsibility to support not just learning but learning transfer and improved results in the workplace. So, it’s important to ask a few questions: Are our traditional training approaches supporting learning transfer and business results? How do we…
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Innovating to measure impact

Innovating to measure impact

Training
This blog was originally published on RedR UK. RedR UK is again working with the University of Sussex to increase its ability to measure the impact of our work. It has successfully gained the support of the Humanitarian Innovation Fund to design and test innovative methods to better understand participants’ learning and changes in behaviour following humanitarian capacity-building interventions. This project will build on the work done in 2016, and draws on the recommendations shared in our previous publication on this subject. Based on RedR UK research to date and analysis of RedR programmes, evaluation and impact data, three methodologies will be prototyped and tested: (more…)
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